Fluorescently tagged cultured HeLa cellsCredit: NIH Image Gallery/Tom Deerinck (Flickr) Multiphoton fluorescence image of cultured HeLa cells

HeLa, the VIP of cell lines

by • May 29, 2017 • Cancer, Cell biology, Cool Science, Genetics, Gesa Junge, Science News, Science PolicyComments (0)550

By  Gesa Junge, PhD

A month ago, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks was released on HBO, an adaptation of Rebecca Skloot’s 2010 book of the same title. The book, and the movie, tell the story of Henrietta Lacks, the woman behind the first cell line ever generated, the famous HeLa cell line. From a biologist’s standpoint, this is a really unique thing, as we don’t usually know who is behind the cell lines we grow in the lab. Which, incidentally, is at the centre of the controversy around HeLa cells. HeLa was the first cell line ever made over 60 years ago and today a PubMed search for “HeLa” return 93274 search results.

Cell lines are an integral part to research in many fields, and these days there are probably thousands of cell lines. Usually, they are generated from patient samples which are immortalised and then can be grown in dishes, put under the microscope, frozen down, thawed and revived, have their DNA sequenced, their protein levels measured, be genetically modified, treated with drugs, and generally make biomedical research possible. As a general rule, work with cancer cell lines is an easy and cheap way to investigate biological concepts, test drugs and validate methods, mainly because cell lines are cheap compared to animal research, readily available, easy to grow, and there are few concerns around ethics and informed consent. This is because although they originate from patients, the cell lines are not considered living beings in the sense that they have feelings and lives and rights; they are for the most part considered research tools. This is an easy argument to make, as almost all cell lines are immortalised and therefore different from the original tissues patients donated, and most importantly they are anonymous, so that any data generated cannot be related back to the person.

But this is exactly what did not happen with HeLa cells. Henrietta Lack’s cells were taken without her knowledge nor consent after she was treated for cervical cancer at Johns Hopkins in 1951. At this point, nobody had managed to grow cells outside the human body, so when Henrietta Lack’s cells started to divide and grow, the researchers were excited, and yet nobody ever told her, or her family. Henrietta Lacks died of her cancer later that year, but her cells survived. For more on this, there is a great Radiolab episode that features interviews with the scientists, as well as Rebecca Skloot and Henrietta Lack’s youngest daughter Deborah Lacks Pullum.

In the 1970s, some researchers did reach out to the Lacks family, not because of ethical concerns or gratitude, but to request blood samples. This naturally led to confusion amongst family members around how Henrietta Lack’s cells could be alive, and be used in labs everywhere, even go to space, while Henrietta herself had been dead for twenty years. Nobody had told them, let alone explained the concept of cell lines to them.

The lack of consent and information are one side, but in addition to being an invaluable research tool, cell lines are also big business: The global market for cell lines development (which includes cell lines and the media they grow in, and other reagents) is worth around 3 billion dollars, and it’s growing fast. There are companies that specialise in making cell lines of certain genotypes that are sold for hundreds of dollars, and different cell types need different growth media and additives in order to grow. This adds a dimension of financial interest, and whether the family should share in the profit derived from research involving HeLa cells.

We have a lot to be grateful for to HeLa cells, and not just biomedical advances. The history of HeLa brought up a plethora of ethical issues around privacy, information, communication and consent that arguably were overdue for discussion. Innovation usually outruns ethics, but while nowadays informed consent is standard for all research involving humans, and patient data is anonymised (or at least pseudonomised and kept confidential), there were no such rules in 1951. There was also apparently no attempt to explain scientific concept and research to non-scientists.

And clearly we still have not fully grasped the issues at hand, as in 2013 researchers sequenced the HeLa cell genome – and published it. Again, without the family’s consent. The main argument in defence of publishing the HeLa genome was that the cell line was too different from the original cells to provide any information on Henrietta Lack’s living relatives. There may some truth in that; cell lines change a lot over time, but even after all these years there will still be information about Henrietta Lack’s and her family in there, and genetic information is still personal and should be kept private.

HeLa cells have gotten around to research labs around the world and even gone to space and on deep sea dives. And they are now even contaminating other cell lines (which could perhaps be interpreted as just karma). Sadly, the spotlight on Henrietta Lack’s life has sparked arguments amongst the family members around the use and distribution of profits and benefits from the book and movie, and the portrayal of Henrietta Lack’s in the story. Johns Hopkins say they have no rights to the cell line, and have not profited from them, and they have established symposiums, scholarships and awards in Henrietta Lack’s honour.

The NIH has established the HeLa Genome Data Access Working Group, which includes members of Henrietta Lack’s family. Any researcher wanting to use the HeLa cell genome in their research has to request the data from this committee, and explain their research plans, and any potential commercialisation. The data may only be used in biomedical research, not ancestry research, and no researcher is allowed to contact the Lacks family directly.

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